How To: Vote in Quebec Provincial Elections

by Apathy is Boring — March 6, 2014


A Quebec election has been called. Will it be your first time? Don't be nervous. An election is your chance to make your voice heard. Just follow this step-by-step guide and cast your ballot like a pro.

 
Can I vote without having to read this whole guide?
Am I eligible to vote?
Am I registered to vote?
Where and when can I vote on election day?
What ID do I need to vote?
What if I can't make it to a polling station on election day?
What if I’m working on election day?
What if I'm living abroad or won't be in my riding during the election?
What if I’m a student living away from home?
What if I changed addresses recently?
Where do I vote if I'm homeless?
Can I vote if I live on a reserve?
Where can I learn more about the different parties?
Where can I get more information about voting?
What are some important dates?
 
 

Can I vote without having to read this whole guide?

 
Yes. A picture is worth a thousand words, and a flowchart is worth even more. Click on this easy-to-use voting flowchart for answers to (almost) all of your questions:
 

How To Vote Infographic

 

Am I eligible to vote?

 
In order to vote in a Quebec provincial election, you must be:
  • Registered on the voters list no later than April 3 at 2:00 pm;
  • 18 years of age or older on election day;
  • A Canadian citizen;
  • A resident of Quebec for six months prior to election day.
 
 

Am I registered to vote?

 
You can check if you are registered on the list of electors here. You should also receive a letter on or before March 16 indicating who is already registered at your address, with information about where and when you can vote.
 
You can register from March 17 to April 3 at your local revision office. Revision offices are open from 9:00 am to 9:00 pm on weekdays and 9:00 am to 5:00 pm on weekends, except the last day, when it is open until 2:00 pm.
 
You need to show two pieces of ID to register:
  • One with your name and your date of birth (birth certificate, health insurance card, etc.);
  • Another with your name and your address (driver's license, telephone bill, etc.).
 

Where and when can I vote on election day?

 
You can find your polling station for advance or regular polling here.
 
Election Day in Quebec is April 7 and polls are open from 9:30 am to 8:00 pm. To vote, you must be registered on the voters list no later than April 3 at 2:00 pm.
 
 

What ID do I need to vote?

 
To vote, you have to present one piece of government-issued ID. You can present the following:
  • Driver's license;
  • Health-insurance card;
  • Canadian passport;
  • Certificate of Indian status;
  • Canadian Forces Identification Card
 

What if I can't make it to a polling station on election day?

 
Don't worry - you can still vote at advance polls, at the office of the returning officer, or by mail-in ballot.
 
Voting at advance polls is just like voting on election day, but earlier. The advance polls are open from 9:30 am to 8:00 pm on March 30-31. You can find the location of your advance polling station here.
 
You can also vote at the office of a returning officer, which is set up in each riding during the election, on any of the following days:
  • March 28, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.;
  • March 29, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m;
  • April 1 and 2, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m;
  • April 3, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m
 
If you're outside Quebec during the election, a special ballot allows you to vote by mail. You can apply for a special ballot here.
 
 

What if I’m working on election day?

 
Your employer has to give you four consecutive hours off while the polls are open between 9:30 am and 8:00 pm. It's your right.
 
 

What if I'm living abroad or won't be in my riding during the election?

 
If you are in Quebec but not in your riding, you can vote at any office of the returning officer on the following days:
  • March 28, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.;
  • March 29, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m;
  • April 1 and 2, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m;
  • April 3, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m
 
If you are out of the province, a special ballot allows you to vote by mail. You can apply for a special ballot here.
 
 

What if I'm a student living away from home?

 
If your family lives in Quebec, you have two options:
  • You can vote in the riding where your parents live by going to any revision office on one of the following days:
    • March 28, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.;
    • March 29, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m;
    • April 1 and 2, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m;
    • April 3, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m
  • You can vote in the riding where you will live in April. To do so, you just have to register to vote in that riding.
 
If your family lives outside Quebec but you have lived here for at least six months, you can vote in the upcoming election. All you have to do is register to vote in Quebec.
You can also vote in your school for a candidate from your home electoral division. On March 28 and April 1 to 3, 2014. You can find out if your school will have a polling station here.
 
 

What if I changed addresses recently?

 
You can update your registration by going to your revision office between March 17 to April 3. The office is open from 9:00 am to 9:00 pm on weekdays and 9:00 am to 5:00 pm on weekends, except the last day when the office is open until 2:00 pm. You need to show two pieces of ID to register -- one with your address and the other with your date of birth.
 
 

Where do I vote if I'm homeless?

 
You can vote in the riding where the shelter or hostel that you use most often is located. To register, you can present a letter from a shelter or hostel attesting that you live there from time to time. You can also get someone who knows you to vouch for you at the revision office. You will then need to show ID to vote.
 
 

Can I vote if I live on a reserve?

 
Yes, you are eligible to vote in the riding where your reserve is located. You can find the location of your polling station here.
 
 

Where can I learn more about the different parties?

 
You can see a list of the registered political parties in Quebec on the DGEQ website. You can also get more information from their individual websites:
 
 

Where can I get more information about voting?

 
You can get more information and assistance from the DGEQ.
 
 

What are some important dates?

 
Election day is April 7 and polls are open from 9:30 am to 8:00 pm.
 
Advance polls are on March 30-31 and they are open from 9:30am to 8:00 pm.
 
You can vote at any office of the returning officer on the following days:
  • March 28, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.;
  • March 29, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m;
  • April 1 and 2, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m;
  • April 3, 2014, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m
 
You can apply for a mail-in ballot here
 
Revision offices are open from March 17 to April 3, from 9:00 am to 9:00 pm on weekdays and from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm on weekends, except the last day, when it is open until 2:00 pm. That’s where you can register to vote or update your information.
 

 

 

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